Babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan. Babylon East: Performing Dancehall, Roots Reggae, and Rastafari in Japan by Marvin Sterling 2019-03-26

Babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan Rating: 9,7/10 346 reviews

Download [PDF] Babylon East Performing Dancehall Roots Reggae And Rastafari In Japan E Duke Books Scholarly Collection Free Online

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

Sterling traces the history of the Japanese embrace of dancehall reggae and other elements of Jamaican culture, including Rastafari, roots reggae, and dub music. Japanese police racially profile 'foreign-looking' bystanders for invasive questioning on the street. He illuminates issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class as he discusses topics ranging from the cultural capital that Japanese dancehall artists amass by immersing themselves in dancehall culture in Jamaica, New York, and England, to the use of Rastafari as a means of critiquing class difference, consumerism, and the colonial pasts of the West and Japan. These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. In 2002, the Japanese dancer Junko Kudo became the first non-Jamaican to win Jamaicas National Dancehall Queen Contest. Sterling provides a nuanced ethnographic analysis of the ways that many Japanese involved in reggae as musicians and dancers, and those deeply engaged with Rastafari as a spiritual practice, seek to reimagine their lives through Jamaican culture.

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PDF Download Babylon East Performing Dancehall Roots Reggae And Rastafari In Japan E Duke Books Scholarly Collection Free

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

His work should inspire readers to learn more about performance and identity formation in Japan, the truly global spread of Jamaican culture, and other Afro-Asian articulations, performances, and identities. He illuminates issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class as he discusses topics ranging from the cultural capital that Japanese dancehall artists amass by immersing themselves in dancehall culture in Jamaica, New York, and England, to the use of Rastafari as a means of critiquing class difference, consumerism, and the colonial pasts of the West and Japan. Sterling traces the history of the Japanese embrace of dancehall reggae and other elements of Jamaican culture, including Rastafari, roots reggae, and dub music. Sterling spent more than ten years investigating Japanese involvement with Jamaican musical traditions, and his book testifies to the limitations of cross-cultural appropriation even in a globalized cultural scene. In World Clash 1999, held in Brooklyn, Mighty Crown, a Japanese sound system and the only non-Jamaican competitor, stunned the international dancehall community by winning the event. Sterling traces the history of the Japanese embrace of dancehall reggae and other elements of Jamaican culture, including Rastafari, roots reggae, and dub music. An important center of dancehall reggae performance, sound clashes are contests between rival sound systems: groups of emcees, tune selectors, and sound engineers.

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Babylon East Performing Dancehall, Roots Reggae, and Rastafari in Japan

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

He considers Japanese performances and representations of Jamaican culture in clubs, competitions, and festivals; on websites; and in song lyrics, music videos, reggae magazines, travel writing, and fiction. Babylon East makes useful and complex contributions to a number of discourses, including: work on popular music, globalization, gender, and race in contemporary Japan; work on Jamaican reggae and dancehall; and broader considerations of Blackness, race, and culture beyond the Black Atlantic, in Afro-Asia. Sterling provides a nuanced ethnographic analysis of the ways that many Japanese involved in reggae as musicians and dancers, and those deeply engaged with Rastafari as a spiritual practice, seek to reimagine their lives through Jamaican culture. This is the question taken up by Marvin D. He considers Japanese performances and representations of Jamaican culture in clubs, competitions, and festivals; on websites; and in song lyrics, music videos, reggae magazines, travel writing, and fiction.

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Babylon East: Performing Dancehall, Roots Reggae, and Rastafari in Japan: Publications: Research: Department of Anthropology: Indiana University Bloomington

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

An important center of dancehall reggae performance, sound clashes are contests between rival sound systems: groups of emcees, tune selectors, and sound engineers. Sterling sensitively portrays the wide range of Japanese reggae dancehall practitioners, from chart-topping stars such as Miki Dozan to underground pioneers such as Rankin' Taxi, as well as Junko Kudo, the unlikely winner of Jamaica's premier dance-diva contest. High-profile victories such as these affirmed and invigorated Japans enthusiasm for dancehall reggae. Legislators, administrators, and pundits portray foreigners as a national security threat and call for their segregation and expulsion. This is the question taken up by Marvin D. Bibliography Includes bibliographical references p. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

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Babylon East: Performing Dancehall, Roots Reggae, and Rastafari in Japan by Marvin Sterling

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

Sterling provides a nuanced ethnographic analysis of the ways that many Japanese involved in reggae as musicians and dancers, and those deeply engaged with Rastafari as a spiritual practice, seek to reimagine their lives through Jamaican culture. In 2002, the Japanese dancer An important center of dancehall reggae performance, sound clashes are contests between rival sound systems: groups of emcees, tune selectors, and sound engineers. How does Japan resolve the cognitive dissonance of racial discrimination being unconstitutional yet not illegal? Sterling traces the history of the Japanese embrace of dancehall reggae and other elements of Jamaican culture, including Rastafari, roots reggae, and dub music. In World Clash 1999, held in Brooklyn, Mighty Crown, a Japanese sound system and the only non-Jamaican competitor, stunned the international dancehall community by winning the event. Japanese police racially profile 'foreign-looking' bystanders for invasive questioning on the street. In Babylon East, the anthropologist Marvin D. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

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Babylon East Performing Dancehall, Roots Reggae, and Rastafari in Japan

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

In World Clash 1999, held in Brooklyn, Mighty Crown, a Japanese sound system and the only non-Jamaican competitor, stunned the international dancehall community by winning the event. He illuminates issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class as he discusses topics ranging from the cultural capital that Japanese dancehall artists amass by immersing themselves in dancehall culture in Jamaica, New York, and England, to the use of Rastafari as a means of critiquing class difference, consumerism, and the colonial pasts of the West and Japan. He considers Japanese performances and representations of Jamaican culture in clubs, competitions, and festivals; on websites; and in song lyrics, music videos, reggae magazines, travel writing, and fiction. The E-mail message field is required. . High-profile victories such as these affirmed and invigorated. In World Clash 1999, held in Brooklyn, Mighty Crown, a Japanese sound system and the only non-Jamaican competitor, stunned the international dancehall community by winning the event.

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Babylon East : performing, dancehall, roots reggae and Rastafari in Japan in SearchWorks catalog

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

Sterling traces the history of the Japanese embrace of dancehall reggae and other elements of Jamaican culture, including Rastafari, roots reggae, and dub music. These topics are important to both the study of anthropology and understanding of the world around you. Employers and landlords routinely refuse jobs and apartments to foreign applicants. An important center of dancehall reggae performance, sound clashes are contests between rival sound systems: groups of emcees, tune selectors, and sound engineers. In World Clash 1999, held in Brooklyn, Mighty Crown, a Japanese sound system and the only non-Jamaican competitor, stunned the international dancehall community by winning the event. He considers Japanese performances and representations of Jamaican culture in clubs, competitions, and festivals; on websites; and in song lyrics, music videos, reggae magazines, travel writing, and fiction.

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Babylon East Performing Dancehall, Roots Reggae, and Rastafari in Japan

babylon east performing dancehall roots reggae and rastafari in japan

Sterling considers Japanese performances and representations of Jamaican culture in clubs, competitions, and festivals; in the city and the countryside; in song lyrics, music videos and on websites; and, in texts including reggae magazines, travel writing, fiction, and self-help books. He illuminates issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class as he discusses topics ranging from the cultural capital that Japanese dancehall artists amass by immersing themselves in dancehall culture in Jamaica, New York, and England, to the use of Rastafari as a means of critiquing class difference, consumerism, and the West's and Japan's colonial pasts. In World Clash 1999, held in Brooklyn, Mighty Crown, a Japanese sound system and the only non-Jamaican competitor, stunned the international dancehall community by winning the event. Publisher's Summary An important centre of dancehall reggae performance, sound clashes are contests between rival sound systems: groups of emcees, tune selectors, and sound engineers. Encompassing the reactions of Jamaica's artists to Japanese appropriations of Jamaican culture, as well as the relative positions of Jamaica and Japan in the world economy, Babylon East is a rare ethnographic account of Afro-Asian cultural exchange and global discourses of blackness beyond the African diaspora. He illuminates issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class as he discusses topics ranging from the cultural capital that Japanese dancehall artists amass by immersing themselves in dancehall culture in Jamaica, New York, and England, to the use of Rastafari as a means of critiquing class difference, consumerism, and the colonial pasts of the West and Japan. The text focuses on how culture directs and explains people's behavior, thereby helping students understand the world today as well as how humans can solve problems and effect positive change.

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