In the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown. Nathaniel Philbrick In The Hurricane's Eye 2019-01-25

In the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown Rating: 6,9/10 1149 reviews

NATHANIEL PHILBRICK

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

By the winter of 1780, Continental Army morale was low — and it would sink even deeper in early 1781 when news reached Washington that Benedict Arnold had escaped capture after pillaging Richmond. Viking Philbrick is a master of narrative, and he does not disappoint as he provides a meticulous and often hair-raising account of a naval war between France and England and a land war that pitted American and French troops against British regulars and Loyalist volunteers. Philbrick came away from this book with a deep sense of admiration for Washington. When writing on a subject with such scope - an author can write broadly on the subject with little depth, or narrowly with great depth — this tale is written narrowly on a single period of battle — essentially the last year of the revolutionary War — but with great depth to give us the whole story. Readers are reminded of the plight of the common American militiaman, who after six years at war are released without recompense, worn out, to an uncertain future. Recognized today as one of the most important naval engagements in the history of the world, the Battle of the Chesapeake--fought without a single American ship--made the subsequent victory of the Americans at Yorktown a virtual inevitability.

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Review of “In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown” by Nathaniel Philbrick

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

As the fighting took place in the Carolinas and Virginia, the French, with Spanish help, looked to move its naval forces through the Caribbean and up towards the Chesapeake. They had a fateful meeting in the Chesapeake Bay on September 5, 1781, in an exciting battle that changed everything for the combatants on land. And to say the least, we miss out on quite a bit of all that led up to the pivotal moment. That third tempest caught the Spanish fleet at sea and nearly destroyed it. The reason is that the defeat of a British fleet by a French fleet enabled the Revolutionary Army to prevail on land. This probably deserves 4 stars, as part of the reason I read this was to learn more about the Revolutionary War, which I had realized that I didn't really know all that much about. And then, on September 5, 1781, the impossible happened.

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Review of “In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown” by Nathaniel Philbrick

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

If the author ever updates his book, here are some recommendations: 1. This book focuses on the activity of the French fleet in both the Atlantic and the Caribbean. There was a point at which I was going to give up. The last half of the book really picks up on some important components that really ended the war - some completely due to chance and personalities. Only the political acumen and statesmen like presence of George Washington defuses their anger and allows the situation to be resolved peacefully. Philbrick is a good writer and he knows his stuff.

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In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown [ebook free] by Nathaniel Philbrick (epub/mobi)

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

Ships on both sides were heavy damaged but in the end the British surrendered control of the Chesapeake to the French—and ultimately victory to Washington at Yorktown. Here he seeks to elevate the naval battles between the French and British to a central place in the history of the American Revolution. Those with the most Biblical lifespans live well into the 19th century, practically to the eve of the Civil War. He has been passed over for promotion on numerous occasions. The history Philbrick covers In The Hurricane's Eye. They would not agree on taxes to pay for the war, and now they all vied for their own concerns.

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Nathaniel Philbrick, “In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown” (Viking, 2018)

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

Storming of a redoubt at Yorktown, via U. Most of us have no idea of the grand scope of everything that had to fall into place in order to set the stage for the Franco-American victory at Yorktown. However, as any good writer does, he gets a little carried away, either with too much information or too much flowering. To his credit, Philbrick resists the temptation to descend into hagiography. In December 1780, Sir Henry Clinton, the British commander, sent Benedict Arnold, his newest brigadier general, to Virginia. Many of his best-selling books have something to do with the ocean: , and.

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Nathaniel Philbrick In The Hurricane's Eye

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

Without such historians as Nathaniel Philbrick, and they are a mere handful now- where would the recording of history at this juncture be? The book incorporates many little-known vignettes about the war and reads like a thriller. The French decide to give Washington the money to pay his troops. This move proved pivotal for both sides in the war. The Rebels could just fall back inland and wait. Throughout the book, Philbrick occasionally takes what some might argue as unfairly harsh views of George Washington's actions regarding slavery. Philbrick points out some the false myths of American revolution. They might be seen scattered about in every direction, dead and dying with pieces of ears of burnt Indian corn in the hands and mouths, even of those that were dead.

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Nonfiction Book Review: In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown by Nathaniel Philbrick. Viking, $30 (384p) ISBN 978

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

These include the self-absorbed Adm. I am still happy to report that I learned quite a bit about the last year of the American Revolution, which was a treat. Despite these concerns, however, I would highly recommend this volume to anyone interested in the penultimate battle of the Revolutionary War. If you have money, please buy it to support the author, thank you! He went on a three-leg journey visiting all the states. For five years, American and British forces had clashed along the edge of a vast continent and were now at a stalemate. Washington, he admits, defended slavery and was not free of racial bias.

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In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown [ebook free] by Nathaniel Philbrick (epub/mobi)

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

But historians should know better, than to judge historic figures by today's standards--at least they weren't cool with killing babies as they're being born. The book is filled with short vignettes showing the character of many of the players, heroes as well as villains. Here is the story of the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown. An American soldier recalled the result of this decision. Power struggles within each army affected the fate of the armies as well, as did weaknesses for luxury and gambling, and even health issues, which came to play a major role. Philbrick is a master of narrative, and he does not disappoint as he provides a meticulous and often hair-raising account of a naval war between France and England. I have always had an admiration for the loser at Yorktown, Lord Cornwallis.

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Review of “In the Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown” by Nathaniel Philbrick

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

Philbrick has a second, perhaps more compelling theme: how the character of men shapes the history they make. By making the subsequent victory at Yorktown a virtual inevitability, this naval battle—masterminded by Washington but waged without a single American ship—was largely responsible for the independence of the United States. And yet somehow General George Washington had achieved the unthinkable. He can relate in a word or two what others might take a chapter to expound. And the French provide the hard currency to pay Washington's army, preventing the army from revolting and disbanding. Philbrick points out some the false myths of American revolution. But they failed to seize the moment and lost the opportunity.

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NATHANIEL PHILBRICK

in the hurricanes eye the genius of george washington and the victory at yorktown

This might just be the read for you. In Bunker Hill and Valiant Ambition, Nathaniel Philbrick gave us a new and provocative way of looking at the war that created the United States. Discussion: Philbrick is great at describing the intricacies of battles both on sea and land without being ponderous; on the contrary, he is consistently interesting, and explains every aspect of what occurred in a way not only to educate the reader but in a manner highlighting the most fascinating aspects of the battles. Much like today - it's fascinating to see that some scoundrels can become celebrated later through politics and connections. Yes, he The defeated British army trudged out of the ruins of Yorktown to the slow beat of a drum, surrounded by the American militia on one side of the road and the French on the other.

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